.

Black History Month Events in St. Charles, St. Louis Counties

Check out these events which commemorate Black History Month.

Black History Month Events in St. Charles County 

Human Race Experience Kiosk, Jan. 28-Feb. 1, in the Daniel J. Conoyer Social Science Building lounge at St. Charles Community College, a Human Race Experience kiosk will be set up to encourage one to consider race, racism and identity in a new light.

“Race-The Power of Illusion: The Difference Between Us (Episode 1)” Documentary, 10 a.m. Jan. 28, St. Charles Community College Social Sciences Building Auditorium. Following each film, there will be discussion about race led by associate professor of sociology, Vicky Herbel. For more information, contact Vicky Herbel.

“Race-The Power of Illusion: The Story We Tell (Episode 2)” Documentary, 11:30 a.m. Jan. 29, St. Charles Community College Social Sciences Building Auditorium. Following each film, there will be discussion about race led by associate professor of sociology, Vicky Herbel. For more information, contact Vicky Herbel.

“Race-The Power of Illusion: The House We Live In (Episode 3)” 1 p.m. Jan. 30, St. Charles Community College Social Sciences Building Auditorium. Following each film, there will be discussion about race led by associate professor of sociology, Vicky Herbel. For more information, contact Vicky Herbel.

“A Lot Like You” Film Showing, 12 p.m. Feb. 4, St. Charles Community College Social Sciences Building Auditorium. The film will be followed up with a question and answer discussion with Eli Kimaro, the director and writer of the film. Free popcorn will be provided, and other concession items will be available for purchase at the film showing.

A Question of Black Genocide, Feb. 6, Lindenwood University Harmon Hall, Room 136. Showing “Maafa 21.”  Guest speaker will be Connie Eller, Our Lady’s Inn maternity homes.  Sponsored by the Lindenwood University Black Student Union. Contact:  Ambur Pankins at amburvictoria@yahoo.com. 

Eli Kimaro Lecture, 7 p.m. Feb. 7, St. Charles Community College Social Sciences Building Auditorium. 

“More Than a Month” Documentary Showing, 7 p.m. Feb. 12, St. Charles Community College Social Sciences Building Auditorium. Should Black History be honored only in February? Should heritage months be recognized at all? The PBS documentary “More Than A Month” offers perspective on the topic, followed by a panel discussion hosted by Grace Moser, assistant professor of history at SCC.

BSU Movie Night 3 p.m. Feb. 12, Lindenwood University Spellman Center, room 3105. Movie: “Red Tails.” Sponsored by the Lindenwood University Black Student Union. Contact:  Ambur Pankins at amburvictoria@yahoo.com.

Black History Month Lunchtime trivia, 12 p.m. Feb. 13, St. Charles Community College Cafe Bookstore. 

Visit to The Griot Museum of Black History, 2 p.m. Feb. 15, Lindenwood University.Bus departs Lindenwood University for the Griot Museum of Black History at 2505 Saint Louis Avenue, and will return by 6 p.m.  Sponsored by the Lindenwood University Black Student Union.  Contact:  Ambur Pankins at amburvictoria@yahoo.com. 

Black Women and Words of History Poetry Event, 6 p.m. Feb. 18, Lindenwood University Butler Loft. Features women poets.  Hosted by national spoken word artist, Brandon Thornton. Contact:  Ambur Pankins at amburvictoria@yahoo.com. 

“Black Women in History” Movie & Discussion, 7 p.m. Feb. 22 and 23, Lindenwood University Young Hall Auditorium. “My Mic Sounds Nice,  Women & Their Roles in Hip Hop.” Sponsored by the Lindenwood University Black Student Union. Contact: Ambur Pankins at amburvictoria@yahoo.com. 

Black History Month Gospel Concert, 6 p.m. Feb. 24, Lindenwood University Cultural Center, 400 N. Kingshighway St. Charles, MO. Sponsored by the Lindenwood University Black Student Union. Contact: Ambur Pankins at amburvictoria@yahoo.com. 

"Unconditional" 7 p.m. Feb. 20, Lindenwood University Young Hall Auditorium, Sponsored by the Lindenwood University Black Student Union.   Contact: Ambur Pankins at amburvictoria@yahoo.com

 

Events in Mid-St. Louis County

DreamWeavers: A Community in Action Kick–off, 7 p.m. Jan. 25, St. Louis County Library Headquarters 1640 S. Lindbergh Blvd.Featuring nationally acclaimed restaurant owner and Oprah Winfrey Network (OWN) television star Miss Robbie Montgomery. Montgomery owns three highly successful soul food restaurants in St. Louis and is the star of the top-rated television program, “Welcome to Sweetie Pies” seen weekly on OWN television. She will share her fascinating life journey to becoming a business woman and renowned family matriarch. Join us afterwards for a sample of desserts from Sweetie Pies.  

Tracing African American Roots in Missouri, 2 p.m. Jan. 26, St. Louis County Library Bridgeton Trails Branch, 3455 McKelvey Road. Guest speaker James Vincent, co–founder of the St. Louis African American History and Genealogy Society, will be discussing how to trace African American ancestry in 72Missouri. This program provides tools for both beginners and experienced researchers. Light refreshments will be provided. 

Rhythm and Folklore of Africa, 7 p.m. Feb. 4, St. Louis County Library Bridgeton Trails Branch, 3455 McKelvey Road. Experience a unique combination of storytelling, drumming and dance. Hand–picked customers will be dancing and playing the African instruments. Immerse yourself in the rhythms of Africa as you join Kenya Ajanaku in this exciting program.

Celebrate Black History Month Story Time, 10 a.m. Feb. 7, St. Louis County Library Rock Road Branch10267 St. Charles Rock Rd. Join us for stories and activities that celebrate Black History Month. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Recommended for ages 2–6.  Events are FREE and open to the public.   

An Evening of Stories, 7 p.m. February 7, St. Louis County Library Bridgeton Trails Branch, 3455 McKelvey Road. Enjoy hearing African American children’s literature, then create a collage that is all about you. Ages 5–7.  

Celebrating Black History Month Movie, 7 p.m. Feb. 7, 14, 21 and 28, St. Louis County Library Bridgeton Trails Branch, 3455 McKelvey Road. To celebrate we will be showing parts one and two of “African American Lives” the genealogical documentary hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr.

Remembering African American Lives, 10:30 a.m. Feb. 8, St. Louis County Library Bridgeton Trails Branch, 3455 McKelvey Road. Join us to share your memories of what life was like growing up as an African American child. We’ll try to recall the stories that were passed down to us by our parents and grandparents. Adults. Events are FREE and open to the public.   

“Who Did It? The Three Little Pigs” by Tre’von Griffith presented by the Black Rep, 7 to 9 p.m. Feb. 8, St. Louis County Library Headquarters, 1640 S. Lindbergh Blvd. This lively and entertaining show offers a contemporary twist on a classic tale and also features original music by Tre’von. Afterwards enjoy an  inspiring puppet ministry by Antioch Baptist Church as well as a variety of refreshments provided by a local African American restaurant.  Events are FREE and open to the public.   

Black History Month Movie Presentation: “The Help”, 6:30 p.m. Feb. 12, St. Louis County Library Bridgeton Trails Branch, 3455 McKelvey Road. Oscar Nominee Viola Davis and Oscar Winner Octavia Spencer portray maids during the civil rights movement of the 1960s.

Family Bingo Night: Black History, 7 p.m. Feb. 12, St. Louis County Library Rock Road Branch, 10267 St. Charles Rock Rd. Bring the whole family and join us for an educational Bingo game night. We will learn about famous African Americans throughouthistory, using this famous game format.  All ages welcome. Registration required. 

106 and Park, 7 p.m. Feb. 13, St. Louis County Library Bridgeton Trails Branch, 3455 McKelvey Road. Love hip hop, R&B and pop music? Play our question-and-answer game about your favorite artists. You can even win a tasty treat or two. Ages 12–17.  Events are FREE and open to the public.   

Dancing Haitian Style, 6:30 p.m. Feb. 21, St. Louis County Library Bridgeton Trails Branch, 3455 McKelvey Road. Kimberly Phillips, director of Banyan Dance Theater will lead participants in exploring 132the rich culture of Haiti through dance and song. Her fun and relaxed teaching style makes learning easy for all. All ages. 

A Musical History, 7 p.m. Feb. 26, St. Louis County Library Bridgeton Trails Branch, 3455 McKelvey Road. Get ready to perk up those ears and snap your fingers. Enjoy learning about different kinds of music made popular by  African Americans. Ages 8–11. Events are FREE and open to the public.   

Events in North St. Louis County

African American Author & Artists Expo, 1 to 5 p.m. Feb. 2, St. Louis County Library Florissant Valley Branch 195 New Florissant Rd.Support St. Louis’ own established and new authors, artists and musicians. Find out more about the people offering their talents in your community.  Events are FREE and open to the public.   

DIY: Design a Black History Month Bookmark, 4 p.m. Feb. 6, St. Louis Public Library, Walnut Park Branch 5760 W. Florissant Ave. We have supplies.  You bring imagination.  Admission is free and open to the public.

African Inspired Jewelry-Making Workshop, 7 p.m. Feb. 6, St. Louis County Library Florissant Valley Branch, 195 New Florissant Rd.Come make your own African inspired jewelry with Imani Aisha Creations! In this 90-minute workshop, participants will be using the shapes of the Egyptian ankh and Africa to make a necklace or a brooch. Paint will be used in the creation process, so please dress appropriately.  Ages 7–11. Registration required. Events are FREE and open to the public.

House of Jazz, 7 to 9 p.m. Feb. 15, St. Louis County Library, Florissant Valley Branch, 195 New Florissant Rd. The sounds of jazz will ring through the air as local band Soul Café Jazz Group performs a diverse and rich collection of music. All ages are welcome. Refreshments will be served.  Events are FREE and open to the public.

Conversations with Sharon Flake, 2 p.m. Feb. 16, St. Louis County Library Florissant Valley Branch 195 New Florissant Rd. Join us for a conversation, via Skype, with the critically acclaimed author whose novel “The Skin I’m In” is still relevant after more than 10 years. In fact, if you don’t already own a copy of this book, stop by the Florissant Valley Branch starting January 14 and get a copy of your own, while supplies last. Don’t miss your chance to discuss your reactions to Sharon Flake’s novels directly with the author. Registration requested. Events are FREE and open to the public.  

Family Read Night: Celebrate Black History Month, 7 p.m. Feb. 20, St. Louis County Library Florissant Valley Branch, 195 New Florissant Rd. Join us for a fun family evening where we’ll share stories celebrating Black History Month. Recommended for children ages 3–11 and their families. Registration requested. Events are FREE and open to the public. 

Barefoot Bookworms Book Discussion Group, 7 p.m. Feb. 26, St. Louis County Library Rock Road Branch, 10267 St. Charles Rock Rd. This month we will be reading, “Bud, not Buddy” by Christopher Paul Curtis. Participants are encouraged to wear their favorite slippers. Hot chocolate provided. Pick up your copy at the front desk of the library.  Ages 7–10. Registration required.  Events are FREE and open to the public.   

Travel to New Orleans, 3 p.m. Feb. 28, St. Louis County Library Rock Road Branch, 10267 St. Charles Rock Rd. Join us for an afternoon of discussing the music, food and spirituality in New Orleans as it relates to Black History. We’ll also have local New Orleans food to try! Registration required.  Events are FREE and open to the public.   


Events in St. Louis

A Trio of Dreamers, 11:30 a.m. Feb. 27, Missouri History Museum West Gallery. Presented by the Hazelwood School District.  Through written and spoken word, music and art, students at Hazelwood East High School pay tribute to three African American leaders:  Dr. Martin Luther KingJr., Langston Hughes and Rollo Dilworth.  Admission is free.  Visit mohistory.org for a complete list of offerings.

“Slavery by Another Name” 1 p.m. Jan. 19, Missouri History Museum.This 90-minute documentary challenges the widely held belief that the enslavement of African Americans ended with the Emancipation Proclamation. The film, based on the 2009 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Douglas Blackmon, tells how even as chattel slavery came to an end in the South in 1865, hundreds of thousands of blacks were pulled back into forced labor, trapping them into a brutal system that would persist until the onset of World War II.  A discussion will follow. 

BSU Dinner and Theater, 2 p.m. Feb. 3, The Black Rep Theater 3610 Grandel Square, St. Louis. Sponsored by the Lindenwood University Black Student Union. Contact:  Ambur Pankins at amburvictoria@yahoo.com. 

“The Loving Story” Screening, 7 p.m. Feb. 13, Missouri History Museum, Lee Auditorium. This documentary tells the dramatic story of Richard and Mildred Loving, an interracial couple living in Virginia in the 1950s, and their landmark Supreme Court case, Loving v. Virginia that changed history.  This program is part of the new Avenues of Activism series.  Admission is free.

Tam-Tam Place, 8 p.m. Feb. 16, Missouri History Museum, Lee Auditorium. Daidie Bathily, director of Afriky Lolo, uses dance and drum to tell an inspiring story about African cultures throughout the diaspora. Admission is free. 

“The Powerbroker,” 7 p.m. Feb. 6, Missouri History Museum, Lee Auditorium. During the 1950s and ‘60s, civil rights leader Whitney Young navigated a divided society.  He challenged America’s white business and political leaders directly, but his efforts to open the doors for equal opportunity were often attacked by black Americans who felt his methods were in contrast with the Black Power Movement of the time. A panel discussion follows the film. 

Seeking Freedom, 11 a.m. Feb. 21, Missouri History Museum, Lee Auditorium. Court documents found in St. Louis tell the inspiring story of courage when slaves from around the area fought for their freedom by challenging their owners in court. Admission is free. 

Boards

More »
Got a question? Something on your mind? Talk to your community, directly.
Note Article
Just a short thought to get the word out quickly about anything in your neighborhood.
Share something with your neighbors.What's on your mind?What's on your mind?Make an announcement, speak your mind, or sell somethingPost something
See more »